An analysis of the party politics in african countries such as ghana

Empirical evidence comes from a unique data set that maps the interaction patterns between MPs elected in In social networks, the nodes are the actors, and the ties are the relationships between them. In a third group of countries, the incumbent regimes were able to survive even the third wave of democratization; this group includes both resource-abundant countries like Gabon and relatively poor ones such as Togo.

Thus, when the economic crisis of the s deprived leaders of their patronage capacity, the breakdown and disintegration of elite accommodation systems resulted in violent conflict in a number of countries.

Post-colonial politics in africa

Whether or not patronage can serve as a mechanism of elite integration depends to a large degree on the availability of resources. There is no room here to provide a detailed introduction to network analysis; consequently, only a few core concepts directly related to the analysis are highlighted. Advanced Search Abstract This article presents new theoretical and empirical insights into democratization in Africa, using the typology developed by John Higley and Michael Burton to understand elite interaction in Ghana. The members are elected for a four-year term in single-seat constituencies by simple majority vote. The theory has attracted little attention in African Studies, where elite politics have been discussed mainly in connection with the phenomenon of neo-patrimonialism. The next section will therefore introduce SNA as a promising research tool that can be deployed to achieve this aim. Structural explanations consider wealth, urbanization, industrialization, and education as factors that are positively related to the emergence of stable democracies. Whether or not patronage can serve as a mechanism of elite integration depends to a large degree on the availability of resources. Michael Burton et al. The ties in a network can be directed, meaning that one node is a sender of something that flows through a network such as information or resources while another node acts as a receiver. The question of why some countries become more democratic than others has been a constant issue in political science.

Overall, structural factors have proven to have significant explanatory power, but there remains a group of countries whose democratic achievements or non-achievements are not well predicted from structural prerequisites.

However, there is still not much clarity about the relationship between neo-patrimonialism and political regimes. There is no room here to provide a detailed introduction to network analysis; consequently, only a few core concepts directly related to the analysis are highlighted.

The aim of the article is twofold. The ability to test theories is generally seen as the primary strength of quantitative, cross-country research.

politics in africa pdf

There are three levels of analysis: the node level, the dyad, and the complete network. Advanced Search Abstract This article presents new theoretical and empirical insights into democratization in Africa, using the typology developed by John Higley and Michael Burton to understand elite interaction in Ghana.

The article is organized as follows.

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Elites and democracy in Ghana: A social network approach